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Game Room Ideas for Kids

Posted on May 19, 2012 | 0 comments




Most of the people we talk to in Maryland, Virginia, or DC about putting together a game room have children that will also use the space.  We love the traditional "man cave", but most families have a mixture of adult and children's activities in their basement or bonus room.  Today we are going to break down the most popular and user friendly game room games by age group.  This is a good way to future proof game room purchases and get more years of fun out of your investments.

Under Five Years of Age:  If you have young children at home the game room is often either a place to go to escape for more adult activities while the kids are asleep or a giant toy filled rumpus room.  It is difficult to keep small kids occupied for long but there are a couple of exceptions.  If you don't have one already get a small to mid size flat screen TV on the wall and buy a game system like the Nintendo Wii.  Not only can you and your not so grown up friends have fun playing Video Games, it is a great way to keep the kids occupied if you want to have a poker night or squeeze in a few games of billiards.  At this age most kids will not be able to grasp the "point" of traditional table games, but they still like to be part of the action.

Five to Eight Years:  This is the golden time where you get to influence your children's interests for possible the rest of their lives.  Most kids have developed sufficient motor skills to start participating in games like Table Shuffleboard, Billiards, Air Hockey, or even Darts!  The key at this age is to start them slow, usually on a stool or with help from mom or dad to hold the Puck or Pool Cue.  Shuffleboard Tables are easier for most kids to get the hang of because all they have to do at first is whip the pucks from one end to the other.  A set of Bowling Pins will help this quickly become a favorite activity!  Don't get discouraged if the kids still want to veg out in front of the Video Game System.  If you take the time to show them how to play traditional games correctly and take breaks when they get frustrated you might be surprised how quickly they get hooked.


                                                                                                Every kid loves cracking a puck into these Bowling pins by Legacy Billiards

Nine to Twelve Years of Age (Tweeners):  At a time where we begin to loose our kids undivided attention to the glut of media and outside peer influence there is still a place to go for real family time:  the Game Room!  If you spent time when they were younger including them in games and teaching the basics this can be the most fun you ever have in your recreation space.  Think about it, now they are old enough to play ping pong, shoot a game of pool, even throw darts and even win once in a while.  In a couple of years they will be teenagers and much less interested in hanging out with Mom and Dad on a Saturday night.  This is the period where many parents invest in a real lifetime game room activity like a nice slate pool table or hardwood shuffleboard table if they have not already.  Once kids are hooked on these games the tables will see a ton of use over the next ten years.


Teenage Years:  This can be a tough time to get kids to hang out at home, especially with you!  Parents who always had a game room at the house often find that their teenagers end up spending time with Friends at home, especially if the years have added plenty of fun activities.  You might be left out sometimes, but as one father told me recently, "It is worth every penny knowing exactly where they are, even if I can't use my own Pool Table"!  This is the time to add more skilled games to your space, especially Foosball, Darts, Poker, and Arcade Machines.  The key to keeping the game room fresh over the years is adding more challenging and competitive games.  Remember to invite yourself in once in a while to show those kids that Dad and Mom can still kick some butt in their old age.



                                                                                                    The Worthington Foosball is a great tournament table with a higend

College Age Kids:  This is possibly the easiest time you will have enjoying your game room with the entire family.  College kids home for the holidays or summer are drawn to the parents game room like flies to dung.  Paying a dollar a game to shoot pool at college is a great way to get them to appreciate how good they had it at home all of those years.  Now that they really think they are good at these games you will have some pretty heated competition as well.  This is the result of centering your family activities at home around traditional games and not just video games and movies.  Trust me, you will never keep up with new video games like a college kid will, but the rules of Foosball didn't change over the winter.  In fact, you might want to get some new cloth on your pool table or pick up a new pool cue before they get home, no way are you going to lose on your own table after all these years!


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What ever happened to the American Arcade?

Posted on April 24, 2012 | 1 comment

This article is courtesy of arstechnica.com

 

In North America, gamers are now generally divided into two distinct generations: those that grew up in the midst of the vibrant video arcade culture of the '70s and '80s; and those born since.

The latter group's experience with arcades is primarily through redemption-machine-filled restaurants like Dave & Busters and maybe a few neglected cabinets at their local movie theater or bowling alley. But in Japan, this divide does not exist. Arcades there have continued to grow and evolve since their introduction. Multiple floors fill not just with hardcore gamers, but with families and casual players looking for the kind of face-to-face social gaming experience hard to find on this side of the Pacific.

Brad Crawford is a member of the first generation. "I remembered growing up with [arcades], and going [to Japan] and seeing what they had become was just mind-boggling," said Crawford, who became enamored with Japan's arcade culture while spending three years living there starting in 2005. The experience inspired Crawford to create 100 Yen: The Japanese Arcade Experience, a recently funded indie documentary (currently in post-production) that tries to capture a thoroughly modernized Japanese arcade experience completely unknown to most in the West.

Re-learning the arcade culture

After being removed from arcade culture for so long, Crawford told Ars it was a bit hard at first easing his way into the scene, especially in an unfamiliar country. "If you're not a super-skilled video game person, it can be pretty intimidating, because Japanese people can be pretty good at video games," he said. "It's kind of scary at times, especially if you don't speak great Japanese, which at the time I didn't at all."

Crawford said that at first he would usually just watch the high-level competition going on around him more than he would play. Eventually, he found simply sitting down for a friendly match was the best way to break through the language and culture barrier and become part of the community.

"It's hard to break the ice, but at the same time there's those games that you can always just sit down and play," he said. "There's something about that connection that you can find with people that have like-minded hobbies, and through that you can end up having a good experience and making some good friends."

"They're more concerned about not being able to communicate with you in terms of language," he continued. "If you can make video games the language, I think it can become a great tool in terms of communication. If you give them a good game they're going to respect you for that. ... It's just about putting the time in, showing up and being a regular face so you're not intimidating anymore. It's not something that happens overnight. It takes time."

Arcade demography is arcade destiny

To Crawford, the very different fates that have befallen North American and Japanese arcades has to do with demographics and urban planning as much as differing gaming tastes between the two countries. "Japan is so dense in population, such a mass of people, so that's really why things are this way, there's so much foot traffic everywhere," he said. "A lot of North America just doesn't have that quality to it."

Japan's train-based transportation culture makes it more inconvenient for those who live downtown to visit friends in the suburbs, Crawford said. Generally limited living space means the giant suburban basements and rec rooms that serve as gaming palaces for many Americans are a rarity in Japan. In this kind of environment, downtown arcades became a convenient place for people to hang out and have fun before heading home for the night.

"People are stuck downtown waiting for their friends; they don't have massive social scenes at their houses," he said. "I don't know if I invited that many people over to my house in Japan. It doesn't happen."

These factors have combined to create a modern Japanese arcade that would be practically unrecognizable to a Westerner with memories of dingy, badly lit rooms full of young hoodlums. The gleaming, multi-floor palaces cater to all sorts of players. There are crane games and sticker-picture machines on the first floor to draw people in from the street. More hardcore players show off on carefully arranged rows of dance, fighting, and shoot-em-up games on the higher floors.

But that doesn't mean Japanese arcades were always such clean, friendly places. "When we were speaking with people, they would have similar kinds of memories of arcades having a bad reputation in Japan, of them being dark places where delinquents would go," Crawford said. "I think North America and Japan went through the same phase of gaming, but Japan didn't give up and let it die. They took that negative image and really fought against it. Companies like Taito and Sega actively looked for different ways to bring in different audiences." In other words, the only reason American arcades are remembered with a bad reputation? They never got the chance to grow out of it.


Games like this Golden Tee are more often seen in residential Man Caves than Arcades

A Western arcade comeback?

It wasn't until Crawford returned home to his native Winnipeg, Canada that he realized just how much he missed the arcade scene. He had been missing it his whole life. "Physical gaming with your friends has become something that's pretty few and far between now," he lamented. The closest he's come to recreating it on this side of the ocean is by attending massive fighting game tournaments, like the Evolution event in Las Vegas. Last year, Evolution attracted thousands of people (and over 2 million online spectators) to watch and participate in battles on games like Super Street Fighter IV and Marvel vs. Capcom 3. "You want that experience again, so any time you have that opportunity to experience even a little bit of it, you're like 'yes, give me that.'"

Events like these show there's a whole generation of Western game players, now centered around those in their mid to late 30s, looking to capture something that's missing from much of modern gaming. "Everyone wants that sense of competition, to feed their competitive nature, to beat your opponent," he said. "Now it's just so anonymous. You have little kids swearing at you and berating you [in online games]. At the arcade, you could steal their money if you beat them." Not to mention, if you curse someone out at an arcade, you'd better be big enough to defend yourself.

There have been a few spotty efforts to bring back serious arcades in the US: Insert Coin(s) in downtown Vegas and a recently repurchased Chinatown Fair in New York City among them. But with a decades-long gap since arcades were really a significant part of American social life, Crawford admits bringing them back to their previous stature outside of Japan will be tough.

"Whether we just talk about nostalgia or a movement, I think it could come back," he said. "I think we could see the culture revitalized—maybe not to its former glory, but at some level. There's people out there trying, and I applaud them for it, but it's definitely an uphill battle."


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Pool Table vs Shuffleboard Table: What should I get?

Posted on April 14, 2012 | 1 comment

 The two largest and most expensive games you can add to your game room are either a Pool Table or a Shuffleboard Table.  While many families have both games, for most it is a decision of one or the other.  In Maryland Pool Tables are still king, but Table Shuffleboard is catching up quickly.  In Northern Virginia Shuffleboard Tables have a slight edge in popularity, possibly reflecting a southern influence.  Here is a quick break down of pros and cons of both owning a Pool Table or a Shuffleboard Table.

What kind of space do I need?

A pool table will take up most of even a large room because you need to try and allow 5' or more around the play surface.  The smallest home slate pool table we recomend is 7', or 78" by 39" on the play surface.  This means your room should be at least 16 1/2' by 13' for just the pool table and surrounding area.  For many this means taking up an entire room in the basement or losing other entertainment activities like a big walk behind home bar or full size home theater setup.  Table shuffleboard has a definite advantage in space because nice quality tables can be as little as 12' long and 3' wide.  Unlike a pool table, table shuffleboard can be put right up against a wall, in a hallway, or even up against the back of a sectional couch.  You just need a couple of feet at each end to stand.  The exception to this is a full 22' shuffleboard table.  If that is your desire you had better have a huge room and most importantly, a way to get the thing in! 

What is the family going to be happiest with?

If at least two adults in the house enjoy playing pool then if makes sense to get a pool table because they can introduce the game to everyone else.  The problem with pool is that there is a bit of a learning curve for beginners, so if Dad is a shark and no one else has played before it is not going to be fun for everyone.  One big advantage shuffleboard has over billiards is that almost anyone of any age or ability level can start playing right away.  Unless there is an extreamly skilled player in the house, shuffleboard is a very beginer friendly game.  This fact alone is pushing many buyers into getting a shuffleboard table because not everyone wants to spend time practicing so they can beat "dad" on a regular basis. 

What is going to get the most use over the years?

Both a quality home pool table or a shuffleboard table will be around for decades.  These are extreamly long term purchases, unlike almost anything else you can get for home entertainment.  Most of us are concerned, however, that after we buy one of these games it will just sit around and collect dust because the family has grown tired of it.  The key to avoiding this schenario is setting up our entertainmnet spaces for multiple activities and using the equipment we already have in new and interesting ways.  Shuffleboard tables can be converted easily to shuffle-bowling tables with a simple set of wood bowling pins.  Pool tables have a definite advantage for multiple use because there are so many differnt games that can be played on an American Pocket Billiards Table.  Here in Maryland Billiards is dominated by 8 ball and 9 ball games.  Some players are shooting hybrid games like 7 ball, one pocket, or even straight pool.  There are even special ball sets that can be used to create all new versions of pocket billiards.  Over all, the most popular alternative use of a pool table remains putting a ping pong conversion top on the table and getting two games in one!

 Finally, what is going to be the best value for the money?

This is the big question: should I spend all of this money on a pool table or a shuffleboard table and what is this thing going to cost me up front and in maintanance over the years.  Pool Tables have the advantage in up front cost as a decent quality three peice slate major manufacturer pool table can be purchased new or used for under $2,000.  After that expect to spend around $300 to $500 every ten years in Maryland or Virginia on Pool Table recovers.  Good quality cues, balls, and accessories are only a few hundred dollars and should last at least 15 years.  Shuffleboard Tables are a larger up front investment.  Expect to pay at least $3,000 for a good quality 12' home table, and at least $5,000 for a 20' wide tournament play surface table 16' or larger.  There are cheaper tables out there but the warranties are shady and the manufacturers have no credibility.  After the initial purchase a shuffleboard table requires no maintanance and only a few dollars worth of shuffleboard powder and silicon spray every year.

In the end most people are going to get the game that they played growing up and think friends and family will enjoy the most.  While both of these games represent a major investment in dollars and space, as long as they get used it is always worth it over time.  That is why generation after generation families in Maryland and Virginia have been passing on the tradition of entertaining around home pool tables and shuffleboard tables.

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25 Awesome iPhone Tips and Tricks

Posted on April 12, 2012 | 0 comments

 This article is courtesy of yahoo.com

Whether you're a seasoned user or brand new to the iPhone world, chances are you're probably not using your smartphone to its fullest.

Don't worry, you're not alone, as these pocket-sized computers boast many hundreds of features buried in the operating system.

And so here we share a number of our favorite iPhone tips and tricks, some of which you may know already. Hopefully there's a good number of ones you aren't aware of yet. Most of these following 25 suggestions will work with all versions of the iPhone, but be sure to have the latest software installed (iOS 5.1).

OK, here we go:

Take a photo with your headphone cord: Now that you can use the volume up or down buttons to snap a photo, steady your hand while framing up the photo and when you're ready to take the picture, press the button on the cord so it won't shake the iPhone. Voila!

Dry out a wet iPhone: You're not the first one to drop an iPhone in a toilet or sink. If this happens, don't turn it on as you can damage the smartphone by short-circuiting it. Lightly towel dry the phone. Don't use a hairdryer on the phone as it can further push moisture into areas that aren't wet. Submerge the iPhone in a bowl or Ziploc bag of uncooked white rice and leave it overnight. If you have it, try using a desiccant packet you might find with a new pair of shoes or leather purse.

Dismiss suggested words: If you're typing an email or note and the virtual keyboard is suggesting the correct spelling of the word — and you don't want to accept it — you don't need to tap the tiny "X" at the end of the word in question. Simply tap anywhere on the screen to close the suggestion box.

Take photos faster: Even if your iPhone is locked you can double-tap on the Home button and you'll see a camera icon you can tap to open the camera immediately. Now you can use the volume up button to snap the photo, too. You can also use the volume up on the headphone cord to take a photo (if you want to) and pinch the screen to zoom instead of using the slider bar.

Use location-based reminders: You probably know Siri can be used to set a reminder, like saying "Siri, remind me to call mom at 4pm today." But did you know you can set location-based reminders on your iPhone 4S? Say "Remind me to call mom when I leave here" or "Remind me to call mom when I get home" and you'll be notified accordingly.

Get word definitions: Apple has recently added a built-in dictionary and you can access it in most apps that let you select a word. Simply press and hold on a word — such as in an email, reminder, iBooks, and so on — and you'll see a pop-up option for "Define."

Revive a frozen iPhone: If your smartphone freezes on you and pressing the Sleep/Wake button on top of the device doesn't do anything, don't panic. Instead, press and hold the Home button and the Sleep/Wake button at the same time. You'll be prompted to swipe the "Slide to Power Off" tab. This so-called "hard reset" resuscitates the frozen iPhone. You'll first need to wait through a full shut down and restart.

Get more done in less time: You can create shortcuts to words and phrases you use a lot, such as Northern California Association for Employment in Education. In Settings, go to General, then Keyboard, and select Add New Shortcut. Now you can add new words or phrases and assign shortcuts to them (such as "NCAEE," in the above example, and it'll type out the full word each time.

See a 6-day weather forecast: If you're one of the many weather junkies out there, you probably know you can swipe down the iOS device's screen and you'll see the Notifications center. Weather will be at the top, but did you know you can swipe to the left or right and you'll toggle between current conditions and a 6-day forecast? Plus, jump to the Weather app by tapping anywhere on the weather bar inside Notifications screen.

Select URL domains faster: When typing a website address in Safari, you don't have to type the ".com." For example, you can type "yahoo" in the URL box to get to yahoo.com. On a related note, you can press and hold down the .com button and you'll see a list of alternatives to choose, such as .net, .org and .edu.

Make your own ringtone: Don't settle with the ringtones provided by Apple and you need not pay your carrier for more of them. As the name suggests, the free Ringtone Maker app lets you take a clip from your favorite songs and make ringtones out of them in seconds.

Feel and see when people call: Apple has added a number of accessibility features to iOS 5, specifically designed to assist those with hearing, vision, mobility and other disabilities. For example, those who are hearing impaired might opt to have the LED flash when a call comes in. If you're seeing impaired, you could set a unique vibration pattern for different people in your Contacts, so you know who's calling.

Find your lost iPhone: As long as you sign up in advance, the free Find My iPhone app will help you locate your device on a map (on your computer or other iOS device). You can display a message or initiate a loud ring (in case it's under the cushions), or remotely lock or wipe its data.

Save photos in Safari: You're surfing the web in Safari and stumble upon a photo you'd like to save. Simply press and hold on a photo when on a website and you'll be prompted with a menu asked if you'd like to "Save Image." Once the photo is saved, you can view it offline, email it or set it as wallpaper.

Take an iPhone screen grab: On a related note, if you want to take a screenshot of a website or application, press down on the Home button and tap the Sleep button. You'll hear the camera click, see a white flash and the screenshot will be saved to your Camera Roll.

Get new sounds: It's been a long time coming, but Apple has added the ability to select custom tones for incoming text messages, new emails, voicemails, tweets, calendar alerts, reminders and more. You can select something you like from within the Sounds menu. You'll also notice you can scroll to the top of this list of sounds and you'll see a "Buy More Tones" option, which takes you to iTunes.

Zip to the top of the page: In Mail, Safari, Contacts and other apps, simply tap the status bar at the top of the screen — the area that displays time, battery and cell bars — to jump back to the top quickly.

Prolong your battery: Speaking of the battery, here's how to squeeze more life out of your iPhone between charges. Turn down the brightness of your screen, turn off wireless radios you don't use (such as GPS, Wi-Fi or Bluetooth) and reduce the number of apps with info you have "pushed" to your phone. Also, make sure you lock it before putting in your pocket, purse or backpack or else it could turn on and drain the battery.

Spread out the keyboard for easier typing: Here's a tip for iPad users: If you like typing while holding the tablet, rather than stretch your fingers or thumbs for those middle letters like G, H, Y or B, you can drag the keyboard to each side of the screen to separate it into two, allowing you to easily type while holding it.

Learn some gestures: Close any app ridiculously fast by putting your four fingers and thumb stretched on the screen and pinch inwards. Sweet! You can also magnify what's on your iPhone screen with a three-finger tap. You'll first need to go to Settings, General, Accessibility, and select the various gestures options here.

Create an "app" out of a website you visit often: To add a website to your Home screen, just visit the webpage in Safari and at the top of the screen, tap the Go To icon and select "Add to Home Screen."

Create a music playlist on the fly: You no longer need a computer to create a playlist. In the Music app, tap Playlists, then select Add Playlist and give it a name ("Marc's Workout Mix"). Now, tap any song (or video) to add it to the playlist. You can add individual songs, entire albums, or all songs by a particular artist.

Don't waste your day deleting messages individually: You can delete unwanted emails en masse rather than deleting one at a time. In your Inbox, simply click the Edit button and check off the emails you want to delete with your finger and then choose Delete.

Keep track of your texting limits: If you don't have the best texting plan and don't want to unnecessarily pay to send more texts than you need, here's a tip to turn on the character count in the Messages app. Enable this in the Settings>Message option to keep an eye on your word count. Usually, your one text becomes two after 160 characters.

Mirror your iPhone with your TV: If you own an Apple TV, you can instantly and wirelessly share exactly what's on your iPhone 4S or second- and third-generation iPad with your HDTV, connected to an Apple TV — such as games, apps or videos. Simply double-tap the Home button, swipe all the way to the right and select AirPlay Mirroring.

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11 New Lives for Dead Tennis Balls

Posted on March 30, 2012 | 1 comment

 Thanks to Gizmodo.com for this one.

11 New Lives for Dead Tennis Balls—None of Which Involve Tennis

Old tennis balls may not be able to bounce around the court, but they can be incredibly handy around the house. Here are eleven second acts for the Wilsons. Just give the balls a chance.

1. Park perfectly.

Tape the ball to a string and hang it from the garage ceiling so it touches the driver's side windshield when your vehicle is parked in the ideal spot. Pull forward until you tap it.

2. Remove scuffs.

Cut a small X in the ball with a utility knife. Then stick it on the end of a broom handle. Use it to easily rub off scuff marks on wood or vinyl floors.

3. Put a ball on a pole to wipe cobwebs off ceilings.

4. Cover a hitch.

Fit a drilled ball on a trailer hitch to prevent scratches and rust.

5. Stop doorknobs.

Cut open a tennis ball to protect your walls from door handles if the doorstops aren't doing the job. The ball will at least keep the handle from bashing a hole in the drywall.

6. Fluff laundry.

Drop two or three clean balls into the dryer next time you're drying comforters, pillows, towels or jackets. They'll bounce around and collide with the laundry to fluff it up and dry it faster.

7. Prevent hammer damage.

Cut a slit in a tennis ball and slide it over the business end of a hammer. It'll cushion the face, making a finish-saving mallet to knock stuff into position.

8. Protect floors.

Put balls on furniture legs when rearranging it. Stop scratching up the floor. Make it slide.

9. Deck chair legs get stuck between the boards? Give 'em ball shoes.

10. Childproof doors.

To stop a small child from opening a door, place a ball over its knob. Note on tip five—it works best for door handles you don't need to twist.

11. Make a puck.

In Minnesota, kids fill a ball about a quarter full of pennies and use it to practice hockey stick handling off the ice. The pennies make it as hefty as a puck, so it won't go flying when you slap it. Just tape it up thoroughly.

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Pool Cue Buyers Guide Part 1

Posted on March 23, 2012 | 0 comments

 

 When you are ready to purchase your first two piece pool cue the options can be overwhelming.  Decent quality cues start around $50 and can go as high as $3,000 for production cues.  One off custom cues and collectables can be even more costly.  This guide is a good place to start before buying your first cue, or if you have been out of the pool cue market for a while and want to know what is new.  Either way, the best advice we can give on picking a pool cue is to demo one before buying! 

What To Look For


Here are a couple of helpful tips for the novice pool cue buyer: You don't have to spend hundreds of dollars to get a good quality cue. A perfectly good cue that can be found for under $100. Certainly budgetary restrictions are an issue for everyone, so don't break the bank looking for the right cue. Sporting Goods stores aren't going to carry quality cues, so here's where to look instead:
  • Your local billiards shop or the Web

As a novice pool cue buyer, you're going to need something durable, so watch out for cues that do not carry a warranty against warpage.  It has become common in the last few years for cues as inexpensive as $39 to carry some kind of warranty. We recommend major manufacturers like McDermott, Cuetec, Lucasi, Players and Action, known for making cues that play well but also are backed by a warranty.

Here are some other considerations:

  • The intricacy and aesthetic appeal of inlays-- while they may look sharp, finely crafted inlays can raise the price of a cue by thousands of dollars.
  • You probably don’t want to try out a custom cue unless you’re a very serious player or already know a lot about cues.  Custom cues start around $200 and are a great investment, but typically you will need to have played with a nice two piece cue previously to appreciate the differences.  Even higher end anufacturers like McDermott make plenty of excellent, playable cues good for the novice pool cue buyer.
  • If you’re a female player looking for a good cue, try the Flirt Series from Players or Athena, a manufacturer specifically designing cues for women.  They tend to be a little shorter, offer extension butts, or just have a more female oriented design. 


The Stuff Cues Are Made Of


Consider the materials a cue is made out of:
  • The harder the materials used, the more power your shot will have.   
  • Softer materials provide better control, a need for many players.
  • The two primary types of material used to construct cues are fiberglass/graphite and wood. Serious players opt for wood, but fiberglass/graphite is resistant to warping and some other maintenance issues.  New hybrid "technology" cues combine wood, graphite, carbon fiber, and other materials to create cues that combine more power and control than ever before. 
  • Cues weigh anywhere from 18-21 oz. for standard designs.  Many leage organizations will not allow cues outside of thes range for tournament play.  It is common to see 25oz, even 27oz "heavy hitter" break cues, but they might not be legal in your leage. 
  • What weight you use isn’t really determined on physical strength, but rather on your preference for a heavier or lighter cue. Among professional players, the trend is moving toward use of lighter cues.  Most good players will use a cue between 19 and 20oz to shoot.
  •  Some cues have removable weight bolts, as many players favor breaking with a heavier cue.  Most players use a separate cue for breaking as the tip will get worn out on your shootin cue from the impact of the break shot

    Pool cues are usually 57-58 inches. The longer, more tapered sticks facilitate more spin and ball control. Also, if you have longer arms, a longer cue is a recommended step.  Many nicer cues and aftermarket shafts feature thin diameter, all the way down to 11mm.  Standard cues feature 13mm shafts, while some new "fat shaft" options are available with 14mm diameter shafts.


The Parts That Matter


Some parts of the cue are more important to the shot than others. The cue is broken into two parts: The butt, and the shaft. The butt is the heavier, bottom half of the cue, and the shaft is the top half, ending with the tip. One part many people consider essential to the shot is the joint, usually a metal screw that connects the butt to the shaft of a cue. Some points on the joint:
  • A joint is where a shot’s “feel” is determined. Using other materials than metal—such as ivory, plastic or wood—can change the feel of the shot.  McDermott cues are famous for the "feel" that comes from thier metal pin going directly into the wood of the shaft. 
  • Longer, wider joints generally are longer lasting but tend to take away from "feel".  They are best suited for break or jump cues. 

Consider the wrap, or handle, of the cue as well. If you perspire a lot, a leather wrap might be the best option to absorb that moisture. Wraps are also made of nylon, irish linen, or wood with a high-gloss finish.  New high-tech rubber grips are also becoming more common, often taken from technology in the golf industry.   The tip, or end of the shaft where one strikes the ball, is also critical. Generally made of leather, a softer tip is going to provide better control.  There are a huge range of aftermarket tips available so you are best off talking to a local pro shop or billiards specialty retailer who can install better tips on your cue.  You’ll also want to consider purchasing a cue case to make sure your stick is protected when you travel with it.

The Big Picture


The pool cue is a great investment for even casual players because you will have a hard time improving without consistancy.  Using the same cue every time will allow you to work on things like stroke technique, english, and concentration without having to adjust to a new stick every time you play.  Keeping your cue tip conditioned properly, having the right weight, balance, and taper, all allow you to take your game to another level.  Regardless of your budget, a nice two piece cue will last for years and more than pay for itself in the confidence it brings your game.  Thanks to bourderbilliards.com for some of the content of this article.

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A Lifetime Warranty: The Truth...

Posted on March 05, 2012 | 0 comments


 The majority of manufacturers in the game room industry today offer some form of "lifetime warranty" on their product.  This was not a common practice until the 1990's, when a few companies started to guarantee their product for longer periods to gain a competitive advantage.  In the early 2000's, most companies stated a "lifetime warranty", even if they had no intention or means to honor one.  Most of the fly-by-night manufacturer's are out of business at this point in 2012, along with some very high quality major brands as well.  The customers who opted to purchase from those companies now have no warranty at all on their game room items.

1st Truth:  A Lifetime Warranty is only as good as the chance a company will stay in business.

  Manufacturer's with 30+ years in business, a strong dealer network all over the country, and cash in the bank are much more likely to be around in 10 years when you might need parts.  If a manufacturer is only a few years old and distributes only through it's own web site, how can their "lifetime warranty" possibly be as good as a company with decades in business and a large dealer network supporting them in good times and bad.  In addition, dealer networks demand companies honor their warranties and keep old parts around because those specialty retailers reputations depend on service after the sale.  The best companies even pay their dealers to go back and fix warranty issues, making sure that the warranty is covered for service and parts!

2nd Truth:  Most Lifetime Warranties only cover parts, not shipping or labor.

If you read most warranty statements they are very short and non-specific.  This is to make sure that the manufacturer can get out of real trouble when something goes wrong.  A great example is a shuffleboard play surface, lets say a 16' model.  If you have a defective play surface the wholesale replacement cost to the manufacturer is north of $1,800, not something they want to "eat".  The real story is the shipping to your home, figure $300 to $500 and unloading the truck.  Then a dealer/contractor has to be paid to replace and re-install the play surface, another $200 to $400+ service charge.  Then the old play surface has to be disposed of.  Manufacturer's know that when you call to complain about a little wood splitting or cracks in the play surface, they can point out that the shipping and installation charges are not covered by warranty.  It is a game of chicken, they know you are going to live with the warranty issue to avoid spending $1,000 plus to get it fixed!

3rd Truth:  Most Lifetime Warranties only cover certain parts of your game table.

This is rampant even among major reputable manufacturer's.  In the worst cases, pool tables will have a "lifetime warranty", but only on the slate play surface.  Slate is never mined by the pool table manufacturer, they just buy it and include it with their pool tables.  These manufacturer's are trying to avoid warranties on the Wood Components of their pool tables because that is where the splitting, separation, and finish problems will develop down the road.  The best pool table manufacturer's will warranty not only the slate, but all wood components and even the cushion rubber!  At the time I write this the only companies with a warranty that good are Legacy Billiards, Olhausen Billiards, and Brunswick Billiards.  Even they, however, will not warranty leather pockets so take it easy when you play!  Shuffleboard tables are once again where most companies will play games with what is covered by a "lifetime warranty"  Everyone has a lifetime warranty on the "play surface", but in most cases that just means the Resin top coat not the wood!  Look for one to three year warranties on the wood portion of the play surface and take that "lifetime warranty" with a grain of salt.  Even worse are the cabinets, typically only having a one year warranty, on an item costing well over $5,000 in most cases.  This is another example of most companies offering their "lifetime" warranty on only the parts that are least likely to develop problems.  At the time of publication only Olhausen Games offers a lifetime warranty on all wood components.

4th Truth:  The "Lifetime" in a "Lifetime Warranty" is open to interpretation.

What is the definition of "lifetime"?  Is it your lifetime, the expected life time of the game room item, or is it the life time of the manufacturer's product cycle?  Very few companies disclose this in their warranty statements.  Sometimes the only way to find out is by having a problem years down the road.  We recently had a bad leg on a table from the mid 90's in a customers home (splitting wood).  When we contacted the manufacturer it was discovered that the table was out of production and parts could not be had.  The only option was to send a leg that did not match, which actually honored the warranty on the table to the best of the manufacturer's ability.  The customer had no recourse because the manufacturer's Lifetime Warranty was for the lifetime of the product cycle, 15 years.  Some manufacturers have the ability to build new parts from scratch, but it often involves sending old pieces of the furniture back to the factory to get a wood stain match.  This service is not covered by warranty and ends up costing the owner money.

In the end, the "lifetime warranty" has become a marketing tool used by almost every manufacturer.  Very few companies go into the details mentioned in this article for good reason:  Manufacturer want to avoid honoring warranty claims whenever possible.  The much maligned specialty retailers and online owner reviews are the only thing keeping most manufacturer's honest.  Without small businesses that stake their reputation on service after the sale you are forced to deal directly with the manufacturer when you need help.  That is something to consider when making a $2,000 plus purchase, especially if you have no one to help you locally.  Unlike auto dealerships, no local game room specialty retailer is obligated to help you with your warranty issues, so be nice if you buy somewhere else and need help!  After all, your local specialty retailer depends on your referrals and repeat business.  Manufacturer's who sell direct are insulated by web sites and distance.  Rest assured you will never get a chance to voice your displeasure face to face when your 'lifetime warranty" turns to smoke.

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Best Celebrity Game Room Ideas

Posted on February 18, 2012 | 1 comment

 Over the years, “man cave” is what most people called a spare room in their home. Nowadays, man caves are hugely popular  and are accessorized with comfy couches, giant TVs, sports memorabilia, dart boards, and maybe even a bar. With gas possibly hitting $5 a gallon this summer and the cost of living going through the roof, having a man cave provides the go-to spot for the big game, or simply as a place to relax with all the amenities of a sports pub, without the sports-pub crowd.  Here are some of the best Celebrity man caves to help inspire your dream game room.



When it comes to man caves, Blue Collar Comedy star Dan Whitney, aka “Larry the Cable Guy,” is the master. In building his custom, 3-building compound, he made sure there was a space dedicated to all the stereotypical enjoyments a guy could possibly want in one place. His manly oasis (pictured above) includes a poker table, pool table, bar, flat-screen TV, video machine, bar signs, and turf-like carpet as the finishing touch.

Channeling the atmosphere of a classic sports bar, this man cave has tall bar tables and chairs, a pool table, dark hardwood floors, and — in a nod to the massive scoreboards found in many sports arenas — there is a drop-down bank of four TVs mounted from the ceiling, which offers a 360-degree view of the game (pictured above).  Home to a current NBA superstar and featured on MTV’s Cribs, this home has 7 bedrooms, 10 bathrooms, 2 theater rooms, arcade/dance club, bowling alley, pool, fitness room, library, elevator, 6-car garage, and a 55-ft tall atrium.


Noted as “one of the most significant hunting and equestrian estates,” While not currently owned by a Celebrity, Tudor Farms consists of 6,250 acres and an 11-bedroom, 10.5-bathroom lodge-style home.  This game room could require even the ultimate huntsman to take a break from the outdoors and, luckily, Tudor Farms’ residents don’t have to go far. Among the 14,000 sq ft of living space is a cabin-like man cave with log columns, corner-mounted TV, pool table and bar (pictured above).



Hollywood superstar Nicholas Cage is another of the glitterati who likes to close the doors and lock himself away in his games room. His illustrious house out in Beverley Hills boasts an expensive pool table, and it sort of carries on a tradition because Cage’s house used to be owned by crooner Dean Martin who also had a good eye for the game. Pool, it bridges generations and class alike.



The Orson Welles Luxury View Estate was originally owned by one of Hollywood's golden boys, Orson Welles. Sitting just atop Sunset Blvd, this 3,000 sq ft. luxury 4 bedroom estate features a luxury pool with jacuzzi and a dry sauna, overlooking the stunning views of Hollywood and beyond below. This estate, originally built in 1928, and recently remodeled in several different sections, sits on top of its own roughly 15,000 square foot private knoll.



“We never in our lives would have intended to own a (vacation) house this big, but it was such a deal,” Clark Howard said on recent Sunday in the north Georgia home.  The nationally syndicated radio host known for helping consumers “save more, spend less and avoid rip-offs” has had extensive work done on the house, which is 65 miles from the Howards' Atlanta home.  The fully finished basement features a pool table, keeping with the comfortable and kid-friendly setting that the Howard home provides.


NBA superstar Amar’e Stoudamire's custom home in Florida is the ultimate "man cave".  The home has the kind of smart taste fit for a fashionable 28-year old: Expansive foyer entry, private office, a movie theater, game room with wet bar, plus an additional wet bar. Best of all, in addition to the sumptuous indoor kitchen, there’s a second kitchen to make poolside munching happen in a snap.  There are marble floors throughout, custom coffered ceilings and built-ins, and a huge vacation retreat-style outdoor pool with connecting hot tub that’s surrounded by palm trees, a huge pool deck, and covered outdoor eating space.


 

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Top 10 Man Cave Must Have Items

Posted on February 06, 2012 | 0 comments

 

What a man cave should be

10 Things Every Man Cave Should Have

A man cave should be a place where a man can watch a game, drink a beer, smoke a cigar and shoot some pool without being asked to take out the trash, unload the dishwasher, or feed the dogs. It should be a escape into a world that you have created, so when designing your man cave make sure to think big.

#1 Man Cave Must Have: Big Screen TV

Big Screen TV

Every man cave must have a big screen TV to watch the game or an action flick. The Samsung HDTV is one on the highest quality tv on the market and makes the game or movie feel like its right in from of you. Its crystal clear image is unmatched I would love to have this TV in my man cave. A new 3-D TV could also make a for cornerstone in your man cave.

#2 Man Cave Must Have: Surround Sound System

Surround Sound System

A surround sound system is a must to go with the big screen TV. You don't have to by the worlds most expensive surround sound system to enjoy the game, a simple system puts out great sound for anywhere from $200 to $600.
 

#3 Man Cave Must Have: Beer Neon Signs

Neon Sign

Every man cave has a neon sign make sure you get yours. I like the beer signs for my man cave. There are countless signs available online or at your local lighting store. The light really sets the room off.

#4 Man Cave Must Have: Game Table

Game Table

You must have entertainment if there isn't a big game on so get a game table (pool, air hockey, ping pong, foosball). A pool table in your man cave will give you a reason to invite friends over to hang out. Other great options for entertaining your friends are air hockey, ping pong, or foosball.


The Wind Chill by Brunswick Billiards is our best selling Air Hockey for fall 2011

#5 Man Cave Must Have

Full Bar

Your going to get thirsty so your going to want to have a full bar to quench your thirst. A 60" wide bar unit is just the start, once that is in place you need to fill it with quality products, "top shelf" all the way.

#6 Man Cave Must Have: Vending Machine

Vending Machine

Men love vending machines so make sure you have one. This is a nice item to pick up used or on Craigs List.  You can find cheap new units but they don't typically hold up or look good long term

#7 Man Cave Must Have: Nice Seating

Furniture

You need a comfortable set of furniture, you could always pick up used furniture from a garage sale but you can also get great new furniture for your game room or home theater at a good price. Check out this great set that I have in my man cave.

#8 Man Cave Must Have: Posters

Cool Poster

Posters are a must, you loved them when you were a kid but your wife will not let you have them in your bedroom so the man cave is the perfect place for one. Scarface isn't for everyone sports posters are also a great alternative.

#9 Man Cave Must Have: Kegarator

Kegarator

Owning a kegarator is every mans dream so get one for your man cave. I am the proud owner of one of these bad boys and I have never made a better purchase in my life. It keeps my beer cold and fresh every time.

#10 Man Cave Must Have (MOST IMPORTANT)

Locking Door

You have to be able to keep fun killers out. This lock may or may not work in your door but no matter what you do you need to have one. This will prevent unwanted interruptions.
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Foosball Table Buyers Guide Part 1

Posted on January 21, 2012 | 1 comment



Welcome to part one of our guide to understanding and purchasing a home foosball table.  With tables ranging from $99 to $2,000 it is hard for the average shopper to easily see the differences.  Very few stores stock foosball tables and even fewer have "demo" tables to try before you buy.  That leaves most people buying a table at the local sporting goods store or somewhere on the Internet sight unseen.  As specialty retailers with years of experience here is our expert advice on picking out a Foosball table.

Remember, first quesiton you always ask before buying any game room game is "who will be using this and how long do we plan on keeping it"?  If the answer is "just kids and we are getting rid of it as soon as they get sick of it", then go for the $99 model at Target or Walmart.  This guide is for families who expect everyone to use the table and don't want to have to replace it every few years.

Note:  Ask About The Warranty on Your Foosball Table
Foosball tables should be durable, and built with strong materials for a long life span. If you buy a quality foosball table, it may well last you for the rest of your life. Most foosball tables come with some sort of warranty. One year of coverage is pretty standard for the industry, the only exception is with furniture style tables. Because these tables are more decorative, they tend to carry shorter warranties, but can still be built just as tough.  Remember the key parts of the table and try to comparison shop:  Rods, Men, Play Surface, and Cabinet.  It is also important that you can purchase parts down the road years from now when the table is no longer under warranty!


This Furniture Foosball Looks Good and Carries a 1 Year Warranty, not bad.

Steel Rods
Make sure your foosball table has steel rod construction. They come in three types, hollow, solid, and telescoping. If you’re buying a mid-model foosball table, solid steel rods are a better option. If you’re buying a high end brand, like the one of our Olhausen Games foosball tables, hollow rods are an advantage. The lighter rods will speed up your game play by reducing the weight. Tornado foosball tables also have machine-trued hollow steel rods for lightning fast shots.  The best steel is machine grade cold rolled steel and costs about $10 a foot before machining, so you are not going to see these on sub $600 foosball tables.  Telescoping tubular steel rods are a high end feature designed to protect small children who stand too close to the table and might be hurt by the rod sliding through from the other side.  This is a nice feature but less durable and more expensive than either hollow or solid rods.

Composite or Wood Construction
Foosball tables are made out of one of two things; solid wood or composite.  Composite is also known as MDF or HDF but not all types are the same density or thickness.  The key component made of composite is the play surface and "side wall" where the rods ender the bushing.  Cheap "pressed wood" play surfaces will warp over time because they tend to absorb moisture. Composite doesn’t absorb moisture as easily, so as long as it’s at least an inch thick, composite will be durable, dent-resistant and not nearly as subject to humidity. Most of the tables on this site are composite and use at least 1" on the side walls and play surface.


This Tornado Sport is the benchmark for a Heavy Duty Composite recreational foosball table

Particle Board
Some very cheap tables use a very thin particle board, which is cheaper than quality composite. Over time, particle board can weaken. The material dries out and crumbles, causing screws to work loose and break out, until the table literally falls apart. You’ll know your table is made of particle board if it weighs less than 100lbs, or has less than a 1/2 inch thickness. Avoid these tables like the plague, unless it is just a "toy" for the kids...

Laminated Foosball Tables
When you buy your table, be sure that any patterns on the table are actually imbedded in the laminate. Some foosball table manufacturers make cheap tables with stick-on designs. These low-quality “sticker” designs often peel, making your table look old and worn out. A high quality laminated composite foosball table will not fade like the cheaper models, so your foosball table will stay looking like new.  Very nice Heavy Duty Recreational and Tournament Foosball tables will feature solid wood furniture style veneer cabinets and stainless steel as a nicer looking alternative to the more common laminate.  Remember, this is just the "look" of the table and just because it looks good does not mean corners were not cut on the features we already went over, especially the rods and men.

Foosball Table Markings
The field markings on your foosball table help you line up the ball during play and are an important part of your table’s appearance. Just like other patterns, some foosball table manufacturers use a low-quality stick-on process to apply the field markings to their tables. These markings often wear off, making your foosball table look old and beat up. High quality tables will have permanently dyed laminates, with the design built right in. Make sure you have durable laminated designs on your foosball table.  Some high end commercial tables even feature play surfaces that can be replaced if they ever wear out.

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The Torando T-3000 is the absolute top of the line in US made Commercial Foosball Tables

Foosball In Slow Motion?
Foosball tables have various “speeds”, depending on the surface that the ball rolls over. The smoother and harder the table’s surface is, the faster the ball will travel. For the most part, foosball tables in the US have hard finishes that are quite fast. Some European tables that are made with wood tend to have slower play. The best players in America play only on extremely “fast” tables, like the models from Olhausen Games and Tornado foosball tables, so the best way to improve is to play on this type of table.  This allows passing from line to line, angled shots on goal, and the most important feature of all:  The ability to get better at the game over time!

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